Code of Ethics

Adopted December 2003; Revised May 2013

The principles and aspirations found in the Code of Ethics are not conditions of membership, but are goals and ideals that each MTNA member should strive to make an essential part of his or her professional commitment to students, to colleagues and to society.

Commitment to Students


  • The teacher shall respect the personal integrity and privacy of students unless the law requires disclosure.
  • The teacher shall clearly communicate the expectations of the studio.
  • The teacher shall encourage, guide and develop the musical potential of each student.
  • The teacher shall treat each student with dignity and respect, without discrimination of any kind.
  • The teacher shall respect the student's right to obtain instruction from the teacher of his or her choice.

Commitment to Colleagues


  • The teacher shall refrain from disclosing sensitive information about colleagues obtained in the course of professional service unless disclosure serves a compelling professional purpose or is required by law.
  • The teacher shall participate in the student's change of teachers with as much communication as possible between parties, while being sensitive to the privacy rights of the student and families.

Commitment to Society


  • The teacher shall accurately represent his/her professional qualifications.
  • The teacher shall strive for continued growth in professional competencies.
  • The teacher is encouraged to be a resource in the community.

Anti-trust Compliance

As part of the Federal Trade Commission Decision and Order signed by MTNA in 2014, the association agreed to change its Code of Ethics and will not adopt, encourage its members to follow, or endorse any Code of Ethics provision relating to solicitation of teaching work that does not comply with the FTC Consent Order.

Anti-trust Compliance Guide

FTC Settlement Statement

FTC Press Release

FTC Consent Order

Ethical Dispute?

Direct communication is essential in resolving ethical concerns. Members are strongly encouraged to work out ethical problems themselves. If issues cannot be resolved by the involved parties, MTNA has a specific process for dealing with concerns.

View this process