Tuition & Fees



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Money Matters: Tuition FAQs (Open Access)

An essential ingredient in a profitable business is the amount it charges for its services.

Setting and raising tuition, as well as communicating value, was explored in the previous column (August/September 2018). Determining an appropriate tuition is just the beginning of your studio's financial planning. Equally important is how tuition is implemented and managed. A myriad of tuition-related questions must be answered. …

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Money Matters: Setting And Raising Tuition

An essential ingredient in a profitable business is the amount it charges for its services. In any profession, supply and demand dictates what rates are viable in a particular area. A basic business principle states that tuition should be based on what the market will bear. …

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Collecting Tuition and Raising Rates—How Do Teachers Collect Tuition?

As music teachers we often need to think like business people. We also need to be firm and proactive about business decisions. Increases to your lesson fees are much better accepted if your business practices are consistently professional and organized. …

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The Check Is In The Mail

A new teaching year is under way. Months ago, you updated your studio policy, decided what to charge and communicated with parents. Yet, here it is October and not all parents have paid…

You can prevent misunderstandings and frustrations by clarifying on the front end not just what amount to pay but also how, when and where. …

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The Value of Music Teacher Surveys

One of the most valuable ways to increase professionalism in the independent studio is to network with other teachers about successful policies. Discussing business issues during local and state music teacher associations meetings offers the opportunity to share favorite teaching practices and seek solutions to joint concerns. Such sharing acknowledges that we are not only independent, but also interdependent music teachers. …

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Collecting Payments—Past, Present and Future

Like the English language or our understanding of the solar system, the independent music studio is in a state of constant flux. Today's studio looks and operates much differently than the studio of fifty years ago.…

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Do We Need an Attitude Adjustment?

As independent music teachers (IMTs), we work in a profession that offers a great deal of freedom and personal gratification. Our profession attracts highly educated, creative, hard-working and nurturing individuals, yet most of us are underpaid. …

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Being A Starving Artist Isn't All It's Cracked Up To Be

If we are not happy with our income, do we see ourselves as suffering victims of society's disregard for the arts? How can we avoid the starving-artist syndrome?. …

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Overworked and Underpaid? Take Action!

Let's profile the typical independent music teacher. She started music lessons at the age of seven, studied piano for eleven years before college, earned a degree in music and has taught for thirty years. …

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